Communication

Degrees and Certificates

Courses

COMM/ENGL209 : Journalism I

Students will learn to apply the foundations of print journalism through a skills-based immersion focusing on the craft’s two main components: reporting and writing. Students will learn to operate in a professional news environment by covering a beat and to conduct themselves in an ethical manner.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGL101 or permission of instructor.

COMM/ENGL210 : Special Topics in News Writing

Students cultivate journalistic and writing skills through an intensive writing workshop that emphasizes an examination of different journalism genres that may include public relations writing, magazine writing, broadcast journalism, creative non-fiction, food writing, sports journalism and others. (See the current course schedule for the topic being offered.)

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGL101 with a C or better or permission of instructor.

COMM/ENGL211 : Journalism II

Students will build on concepts learned in Journalism I by learning to write opinion pieces and editorials for daily and weekly newspapers through an intensive writing workshop. Students will learn to research and write opinion pieces and editorials that have impact with the goal of publishing at least one article by the end of the semester. The course will also study the role of opinion pieces in the life of a newspaper and the community.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

COMM/ENGL209 or permission of instructor.

COMM/ENGL220 : Creative Writing I

Study of and practice in the techniques of writing of the four major genres of imaginative literature: short fiction, poetry, short drama, and creative non-fiction.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGL101 with a grade of C or better.

COMM/ENGL221 : Creative Writing II

An intensive course in writing, critiquing, revising, presenting, and publishing in four major genres of imaginative literature: poetry, short fiction, short drama and creative non-fiction.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

COMM/ENGL220 or permission of instructor.

COMM103 : Introduction to Mass Media

Studies the impact on our daily lives of television, radio, films, magazines and newspapers and online media. Students examine how the media influence politics, purchases, and entertainment, and how they affect the culture in shaping beliefs and attitudes. It discusses how each of the media operates and what each accomplishes. By developing their media literacy, students are able to examine the gap between real life and “mediated” reality.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGL080 with a grade of C or better or placement into ENGL101

COMM104 : Introduction to Public Relations

Study of the history and role of public relations in society. Students explore mass media, persuasion, publicity, and radio and television. Students examine special events, crisis management, communication techniques, research and evaluation, communication law and ethics. Basically a theory course, this introduction also applies ideas practically to real clients and organizations.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGL080 with a grade of C or better or placement into ENGL101

COMM110 : Interpersonal Communication

Observation and study of linguistic and behavior patterns as persons participate in one-to-one and group communications transactions. Meets General Education Communication requirement.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGL080 with a grade of C or better or placement into ENGL101

COMM120 : Public Speaking

Study of elements of rhetoric and speech composition as applied to informative speaking; also instruction and practice in the basic techniques of extemporaneous delivery. Meets General Education Communication requirement.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGL080 with a grade of C or better or placement into ENGL101

COMM205 : Television History

This course surveys the historical development of broadcast television from its roots in radio into cable, satellite, electronic networks and the present-day converged media environment. Students learn how television affects American culture, economics, politics and entertainment. Students examine the institutions, structure and programming that has helped television develop into one of our most powerful and important forms of media, binding together America with shared knowledge and experiences and shaping our attitudes, beliefs and values. Students also analyze the interrelationships among television networks and stations with advertisers, audiences and the federal government.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGL101, COMM103, or permission of instructor.

COMM207 : Popular Music & Radio History

This course surveys the historical development of the recording industry from 1900 to the present—with particular emphasis on the way that evolution was shaped by radio. Students examine the symbiotic relationship between the recording and radio industries and analyze how they affected one another during the past century. Students learn how the historical developments affect the industry today—from the minstrel shows through rock ‘n roll, MTV and the current converged media environment that emphasizes digital recording and distribution. Students find links between the past, present and future to understand the contemporary recordings and radio industries.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGL101, COMM103 or permission of instructor.

COMM208 (formerly COMM126) : Film History

This course surveys the historical development of Hollywood as one of the leading exporters of American culture—each year earning billions of dollars domestically and abroad and spawning a litany of film-themed products through ancillary business. Students examine nine distinct time periods in film history beginning with the pre-cinema period in the late 1800’s—organized around four major themes: cultural/historical events, a detailed look at the film business, cataloging of important studio films by genre and an analysis of important films/filmmakers. Students learn about Hollywood’s effects on fashion, language, economics and politics. Students analyze the industry’s celebrity class—the American equivalency of royalty. Students find links between the past, present and future to understand the contemporary film industry.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENGL101, COMM103 or permission of instructor.

COMM295 : Communication Fieldwork

The fieldwork course is designed to provide students with on-the-job training and practice in career settings through a faculty-approved work site with a minimum of 135 hours. The purpose of the course is to apply the principles and theories taught in the educational environment with real-life projects in a professional work setting. Students will secure a position at an approved site prior to the start of the course and complete required hours and assignments by the end of the course. Each student will secure fieldwork that is consistent with his or her professional goals.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

COMM103 or COMM104 with a grade of C or better, or with permission of instructor.